Frequently Asked
Questions

This November, Gwinnett residents will have the opportunity to invest in 82 major transit and infrastructure projects using a new, one-percent transit sales tax. Compared to previous plans, the Gwinnett Transit Plan funds more transportation choices and delivers them sooner, while giving Gwinnett County local control of funding, design, construction and operation of the transit system.

As Gwinnett continues to experience rapid growth, this transit plan offers solutions to help address the challenges growth brings, particularly on roadways.

The plan includes 82 major transit and infrastructure projects, including premium, high-capacity services like rail, bus rapid transit (BRT) and arterial rapid transit (ART), along with multiple other services. Rail will extend from a new Multimodal Hub at Jimmy Carter Boulevard to MARTA’s Doraville Station. BRT will bypass traffic, traveling primarily in dedicated lanes. Expanded Gwinnett bus service will allow for shorter wait times, additional Sunday service and more direct connections. Enhanced bike and pedestrian networks connecting to transit will create a seamless system. Even planning for SR 316 managed lanes is included to make Gwinnett transit even faster and more reliable.

Nearly every city in Gwinnett County will gain new transit services, as well as access to new park-and-ride lots. Cities also gain more connections across the county and region, new microtransit zones and increased paratransit service coverage. For example, the Gwinnett Transit Plan increases paratransit service from 20 percent to 74 percent land-area coverage in the county.

Microtransit offers app-based, on-demand pickup and drop-off bus service to transit and community destinations. It allows individuals to simply request a bus ride that will be provided by the county. Paratransit provides door-to-door services for those with mobility challenges.

BRT bypasses traffic, traveling primarily in dedicated lanes not available to other vehicles and stopping only at specific stations, making for faster and more reliable travel across Gwinnett in premium, high-capacity vehicles. The system also includes informational boards with real-time bus information and the ability to buy your ticket at the station before boarding.

A Multimodal Hub is a major connection point for local and regional transportation services. From the Multimodal Hub at Jimmy Carter Boulevard, rail will extend to MARTA’s Doraville Station. Transit riders may arrive at the hub from trains, buses, cars or bike/pedestrian trails.

The Multimodal Hub will be located near Interstate 85 at Jimmy Carter Boulevard. From this hub, residents can connect across the county and throughout the metro Atlanta region, with a one-seat ride to many Gwinnett destinations as well as to Alpharetta/North Fulton, Buckhead, Downtown/Midtown Atlanta, Tucker and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

The one-percent transit sales tax benefits Gwinnett to pay for local transit projects, with the assistance of federal and state dollars plus funds collected from fares. Anyone who shops or spends in Gwinnett County will contribute to this fund.

No, the plan will not require Gwinnett County to take out any bonds. The Gwinnett Board of Commissioners made it a priority for the Gwinnett Transit Plan to be funded without bonds. The local funding for the plan will only come from the transit sales tax and fares collected on the system.

Gwinnett County continues to experience rapid growth, overwhelming some current transportation systems. The Gwinnett Transit Plan offers solutions to help address the challenges growth brings, particularly on roadways.

Gwinnett County Transit (GCT) currently operates in a limited service area with only local bus, commuter bus, and paratransit services. The limited nature of the existing service means that it is not a viable option for many and can be limiting for those who currently ride. Compared to the existing GCT system, the Gwinnett Transit Plan increases transit service hours by 560% and triples paratransit coverage. The plan includes 82 major transit and infrastructure projects that will make transit a more appealing and useful option for both those who depend on the system today and those who currently don’t ride transit.

Critical portions of high-speed transit services – like bus rapid transit and arterial rapid transit – will be completed in the first 10 years of the Gwinnett Transit Plan. New microtransit and paratransit services, along with expanded bus, bike and pedestrian networks, will enhance transportation options across the county.

In 2019, a referendum to make MARTA the official transit provider for Gwinnett County did not pass. This new Gwinnett transit vote in November puts the county in control of its transit planning, funding, projects and services. It’s more aggressive than the previous plan, implementing many major projects in the next 10 years, and offers more transportation choices. In this new Gwinnett Transit Plan, only the rail line connecting Gwinnett’s new Multimodal Hub at Jimmy Carter Boulevard to MARTA’s Doraville Station will be operated by MARTA, as stipulated by state law.

The Gwinnett Transit Plan is more aggressive than the plan proposed in 2019 and provides more impact, more options and local control. It includes the following additions and changes from the 2019 referendum:

  • Earlier implementation of numerous routes across all timeframes, but particularly in the first 10 years:
    • 2 Bus rapid transit (BRT) routes
    • 2 Arterial rapid transit (ART) routes
    • 7 Microtransit zones implemented
  • 12% Increase in 2017 population within ½ mile of high-capacity transit or ¼ mile of local transit (reasonable walking distance)
  • 1 Additional BRT route (Infinite Energy to Mall of Georgia)
  • 3 Additional commuter bus routes
  • 5 Additional local bus routes

Gwinnett County will have local control of all transit planning, funding, and projects. Gwinnett County will have local control over all system operations with the exception of the new rail line connecting Gwinnett’s new Multimodal Hub at Jimmy Carter Boulevard to MARTA’s Doraville Station. As stipulated by state law, MARTA will operate the rail line.

MARTA will only operate the rail line extending from Gwinnett’s new Multimodal Hub to the Doraville Station. Gwinnett County will have local control of all other transit planning, funding, projects and services, and system operations.

This new plan increases paratransit coverage from 20 percent to 74 percent of the county’s land area.

Multiple new services, including expanded local bus, microtransit and paratransit services, will support people of all ages.

The plan will nearly triple double the number of under-resourced and diverse people served by transit, from roughly 20 percent to 60 percent of the population at full build-out, based on 2017 population figures. The Gwinnett Transit Plan enables transit service and infrastructure additions that directly impact more Gwinnett residents.

Yes, 13 commuter bus routes take workers from nine park-and-ride lots to major employment centers across the region, connecting to Downtown/Midtown Atlanta, Emory/CDC, Perimeter Center and Buckhead. These routes are further supplemented by new all-day Direct Connect service, which provides access to park-and-ride lots from three MARTA stations. Besides the new rail line access to Atlanta, the Gwinnett Transit Plan also connects Gwinnett to existing and planned transit investments in north Fulton County, eastern and southern DeKalb County, and Hall County.

Numerous credible studies have shown there is not a correlation between transit and increased crime rates. In addition, Gwinnett police will have primary responsibility for ensuring the safety of those using the system and for coordinating with other public safety departments to focus efforts to protect transit users and community members alike.

In recent years, access to transit has been increasingly desirable for homebuyers. Areas with transit options also are desirable for businesses and corporate relocations.